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linguistics

Handshake Info Session kda226 Thu, 01/10/2019 - 11:00 am
Date:
-
Location:
White Hall Rm. 233
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Aaron Mueller Awarded NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

We are proud to announce that Aaron Mueller has been chosen to receive a National Science Foundation Grant via the Graduate Research Fellowship Program. Aaron is one of only seven awardees in Linguistics nationwide. 

The Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) is a critical program
in the NSF's overall strategy to develop a globally engaged workforce necessary to ensure the nation's leadership in advancing science and engineering
research and innovation.

Linguistics seminar series: Ashley Stinnett

Ashley Stinnett

Ashley Stinnett, is an assistant professor in the Department of Folk Studies and Anthropology at Western Kentucky University. She received her Ph.D. from the School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. Her areas of specialization are linguistic anthropology with a sub-specialty in applied visual ethnography and educational documentary filmmaking. Her research primarily concerns the sociocultural and linguistic processes in which locally centered, historical and traditional knowledge specific to food are realized and put into daily practice. Ashley researches language production in communities of practice in occupational settings and community driven efforts, specifically related to food production. Additionally, she partners with local community organizations utilizing applied anthropological approaches while synchronously incorporating visual anthropology methodologies in both the practice and the production of visual media materials. Her primary research focuses on language practices of heritage butchers in the Southwestern United States. Her most recent project utilizes linguistic and sensory ethnography in a focus on food fermentation.

Date:
-
Location:
Niles Gallery, Lucille Little Library
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Growing Your Elative: Linguistic Seminar Series

A number of comparative, superlative, and elative suffixes are longer than they would be if
they had simply undergone regular sound changes, e.g. the Latin superlative/elative sux
-issimus. Closer inspection reveals that they have developed in a parallel fashion. The
development involves the analogical extension of a longer sound pattern from a small class
of forms to a large one. I suggest how we might relate this to the semantics of adjective
gradation.
 
Date:
-
Location:
233 Gatton College
Type of Event (for grouping events):
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